Criteria

Before you conduct a further oral activity, you should become familiar with the corresponding assessment criteria. You can become familiar with the criteria through self-assessment, peer assessment or teacher assessment. You can start using the assessment criteria by assessing the sample oral commentaries in this section of the Subject Site.

Here is an overview of the four criteria used to assess the further oral activity. For a more detailed description, you can consult the official IB English A: Language and Literature guide. There you will notice that the descriptors are exactly the same for Standard and Higher Level students. Differentiation between levels is made by the IB when applying different grade boundaries.

Remember: For each further oral activity a reflective statement must be written. Although reflective statements are not assessed, they will serve as important windows into the planning and performing process. Furthermore these reflective statements must be kept on record within the school.

Further oral activity

Criterion A - Knowledge and understanding of the text(s) and subject matter or extract - 10 marks
The student shows an excellent knowledge of the text(s) or topics. The student understands how the meaning of the text(s) relates to the subject matter.

Criterion B - Understanding of how language is used - 10 marks
The student shows how language is used to create an effect on an audience. There is an understanding and appreciation of how language creates meaning.

Criterion C - Organization - 5 marks
The further oral activity is effectively and coherently structured. There is strong evidence of organization. 

Criterion D - Language - 5 marks
The language used by each student is varied, appropriate and accurate. While the nature of each activity may differ, all activities require a certain register from participants.

Remember: Although you may perform your further oral activity as a group, you will be assessed individually. Be sure that you have spoken long enough to be assessed. Keep in mind that teachers can only assess what they see, and not the process leading up to the performance.

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Comments 15

Mary Davenport 29 August 2017 - 14:13

Hi! I'm wondering how much you all guide/conference/provide feedback to students along with way regarding their FOAs?
Thanks.

David McIntyre 29 August 2017 - 20:00

Hi Mary,

In my view, it is really important to conference with students prior to FOAs and to provide subsequent feedback.

Very obviously, we should not advantage students by giving them too overt advice. However, asking students to explain their ideas in advance of an FOA can advance their performance somewhat.

The issue of feedback is a little more complex: Your school may or may not have a policy on what you can tell students when (as is the case with the summative FOA) the mark of the teacher may be moderated. This notwithstanding, the FOA is also a kind of formative assessment; from the experience of an FOA, students may advance their understanding so that they perform better in subsequent FOAs (and Paper 1s and WTs). So, it may be the case that your school has determined that you may not reveal your marks to students, but it seems necessary that students have the opportunity to learn from assessment opportunities through feedback from their teacher.

Please ask if you would like clarification or further advice.

Thanks,

David

Joanna Via Teodoro 6 September 2017 - 06:42

Hi David, I just want to clarify how should Criterion B be assessed for FOA. What should be the focus of this criterion? Can you give a specific example of activity, and how should we assess it? How different is language and style from language alone in Criterion D?

Tim Pruzinsky 7 September 2017 - 11:31

Hi Joanna,

Criterion D is for the language they use in the presentation/FOA. It is not for their discussion of language/style and effect. That is assessed in Criterion B. So, you should be looking for students discussing the connotation of words, the subtext, the irony, the metaphors, the imagery, or whatever else is relevant to the text at hand. Do they understand why the author used that device or convention and why? If so, they do better in B. If not, they do worse. How well they speak, including their vocabulary, tone, and sentence structure is assessed in D.

I hope that clarifies the difference between the two!

Best,
Tim

Rima Moukarzel 18 September 2017 - 20:57

Hello,
Do students have to deal with seen texts(tackled in class) for their FOA? Can they choose the topic and get texts from outside the syllabus? I have average IB students and I am kind of worried. Which do you think is a safe type of FOA? Is it the PowerPoint presentation?

Tim Pruzinsky 19 September 2017 - 00:51

Hi Rima,

Every teacher does it a bit differently in terms of text selection. Some teachers want students to deal with a similar text type (an ad, let's say), but one they haven't studied in class. Others are much more open and just want students to work with something in Part 2 of the course, for example.

As for the style, I really leave it up to the students. I am a fan of creatively engaging the class, but that's a personal preference. Every single teacher likes something different. The key is not to focus on what we like, but to give them an opportunity to succeed and show their knowledge/analysis. Play to their strengths so they can shine.

However, if this is your first time going through it, I would advise you to set it up in a way that makes you feel most comfortable. That way, it takes the stress and anxiety off of you which will take the added stress and anxiety off of them.

Best,
Tim

Rima Moukarzel 19 September 2017 - 05:53

So Tim, I don't know if I understood well, my student gets to choose two topics from Part 1 and Part 2 on unseen texts (same text type, though) and the type of presentation he/she is comfortable with (whether oral presentation, debate,etc.)

Tim Pruzinsky 19 September 2017 - 11:20

Hi Rima,

Let me try again since there was some miscommunication. Ignore my previous post. I've put it in number order to make sure I am clearer this time.

1. Students must complete 2 FOAs. One comes from Part 1 and one from Part 2. These happen at different times in the course. You choose of the timing as long as it is before the marks are due to the IB.

2. For their first FOA - for example, in Part 1 - students can do it on texts studied in class or texts of their own choosing that relate to what was studied. There can be one or more texts and one or more different text types. That's up to you to decide. And then for the students to figure out. In this case, it is not unseen. They will have time to prepare, work on it, and so on.

3. The style of the FOA is up to the student(s). It should match the purpose. If they are discussing language and identity, maybe they have a "chat" at an imaginary coffeeshop where they depict two different authors and how they view their identity. Maybe they just do a powerpoint. It's up to you to guide them.

Please do let me know if that is more helpful.

Best,
Tim

Rima Moukarzel 21 September 2017 - 18:42

Thank you, Tim! It is clear now!
One last question: can they pick literary texts related to the topics in Part 1 and Part 2?

Tim Pruzinsky 22 September 2017 - 00:19

Hi Rima,

The short answer is no. The longer answer is that Part 1 and 2 assessments should be focused on texts that are not literature. That doesn't mean you can't study a poem here or there, but that their WT and FOAs from this section are not based on a whole text studied by the class.

Best,
Tim

Leigh Henderson 29 October 2017 - 06:01

Hello
I am new to DP and trying to mark the FOAs. Only a few of my students have referred to the text that they analysed and most didn't actually mention a specific text but rather spoke generally about the style and language used in certain contexts. For example, one group did a gameshow/role play analysing regional accents and in my opinion it was excellent as they spoke about the historical and social reasons for the differences (showing a very clear understanding). Another group did a chat show about the differing opinions on language change in the digital age but no mention of a particular text. When I look at the rubric both Criteria A & B mention 'the text'. Can you please give me some direction.
Thanks very much
Leigh

Tim Pruzinsky 30 October 2017 - 07:44

Hi Leigh,

I think students can show knowledge about a topic - in this case regional accents - without a text, as I trust what you saw in their FOA. However, they cannot do well in crtierion B as they need to refer to how language creates meaning. Without a text, I don't know how they do this. I also wonder how they support their ideas/arguments/understanding(s) without evidence from a text.

In other words, they really should be basing their analysis of regional accents or language changes in a digital age in a text or texts so they can talk about how the writer created meaning using detailed examples and references to them to support their overall knowledge and understanding.

I hope that helps to clarify things, but do ask more questions if things are still unclear.

Best,
Tim

Peter Thompson 1 November 2017 - 14:39

Hi Tim,

Sorry to ask another question. If a student has read some of their FOA from a Powerpoint Slide (despite me explicitly telling them not to do this!) would just one criteria be penalised? I guess it could effect each of A,B,D but I just wondered if there was a precedent for this? Thank you very much for your time on this, Peter

Tim Pruzinsky 1 November 2017 - 23:29

Hi Peter,

You really shouldn't double penalize a student. I understand how this could apply to several criterion, but pick one, be harsh since you were explicit about your expectations in that one, but don't hit him in more than one because of it.

And please do ask as many questions as you want! That's why we're here!

Best,
Tim

Peter Thompson 2 November 2017 - 09:37

Thanks, Tim. That's helpful


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