P2 HL Core Extension

Links to Pages with Lesson Plans for Part 2 HL Core Extension

This is a link page to sub-pages to lesson plans with learning activities that cover everything in the IB guide for this Unit. Lesson plans include resources to use on an interactive whiteboard and worksheets to print. The pages have full student access to give maximum flexibility to the teacher and the student. There are theoretical notes for extended reading and teacher notes at the top that provide timing information lesson objectives and activity instructions

Links to Pages with Lesson Plans for Power Places and Networks

Syllabus

1. Global Interactions and Global Power

Globalization indices showing how countries participate in global interactions

Global superpowers and their economic, geopolitical and cultural influence

  • Detailed examples of at least two actual or potential global superpowers

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How wealthy and powerful places exist at varying scales, and how the global map is complex and subject to change

Measuring Global Interactions and Role of the US and China as Global Superpowers

This page provides resources for several lessons of teaching. It uses a variety of activities, including Google Streetview, a 9-card diamond ranking on influencing global factors and choropleth mapping the 2016 KOF data, using Google Drive. It uses a  variety of resources including an OECD video, data sets and infographics to explore the merits of three different measures of globalization, before going on to to look at detailed case study resources comparing the global superpower characteristics of China and USA and investigating their economic, geopolitical and cultural impact.

Powerful organizations and global groups:

  • G7/8, G20 and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) groups
  • Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries’ (OPEC) influence over energy policies
  • global lending institutions, including the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and New Development Bank (NDB)

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How wealthy and powerful places exist at varying scales, and how the global map is complex and subject to change

Powerful Organizations and Groups

This page provides and introduction to all the main global organisations. It includes video and text resources as well PDF resources and a fact find sheet. There are a number of ways the resources can be used, either independently or in pairs or groups. Students can role play a global organisation or simply present one. Students should all complete a fact find worksheet. The lesson concludes with a discussion on the geopolitical influence these organisations have and how this reflects on the influence and power of different nations.

Syllabus

2. Global Networks and Flows

An overview of contemporary global networks and flows:

  • global trade in materials, manufactured goods and services
  • an overview of international aid, loans and debt relief
  • international remittances from economic migrants
  • illegal flows, such as trafficked people, counterfeit goods and narcotics

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

The relative importance of different flows, and the suitability of different methods for graphically representing flows and interactions

Global Networks and Flows

This page provides a large number of resources to explore the flow of materials, manufactured goods and services. It begins with a starter worksheet for students to classify key words into players, networks and flows as part of the cogs of the global economy. It then explores the pattern of change and contemporary flows using a number of interactive maps, including a targeted question exercise with the stunning Blueshift Map Maker tool. There are also a number of gallery slideshows to explore. The page concludes with an interesting slideshow from the McKinsey Global Institute as well as featuring a forum discussion by contemporary business leaders focused on the key drivers of globalization.

Global Financial Flows

This page provides resources on different types of financial flow, including FDI, loans, debt relief, aid and remittances. There is a large PDF resource sheet for student annotation and exercises based on the graphs, data and video links. The lesson requires students to describe the spatial patterns of financial flows. It begins with an activity based on the MGI connectedness Index and then looks specifically at each type of financial in some detail before concluding with a look at the complex net movement of financial transfers away from developing countries, based on the stunning research of GFI. This links nicely to the illegal flows of money developed in the next page.

Illegal Flows

This page provides many resources to explore the flows of illegal goods. It begins by looking in more depth at the problem of illicit flows in finance, including the huge scale of illicit flows from developed and developing regions. It then introduces a mapping activity on all illegal flows as well as the illegal drug trade. There are a number of short videos that develop the flow of counterfeit goods and people trafficking, before students explore the concept of nexus thinking and apply it to the problem of transnational organised crime as well as the threat of global terrorism.

Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and outsourcing by transnational corporations (TNCs), and ways in which this networks places and markets

  • Two contrasting detailed examples of TNCs and their global strategies and supply chains

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

The relative importance of different flows, and the suitability of different methods for graphically representing flows and interactions

FDI and Outsourcing - Two contrasting TNC Global Strategies

Apple Inc. is the dominant technology company with a successful global outsourcing strategy. AB InBev is a leading beer and beverages company with an FDI strategy of mergers and acquisitions. Both have massive global reach and sophisticated global supply chains. The page first  introduces FDI and outsourcing strategies before developing a huge range of resources aimed at independent student research to develop two detailed examples of TNCs and their global supply chains and strategies.

Syllabus

3. Human and Physical Influences on Global Interactions

Political factors that affect global interactions:

  • multi-governmental organizations (MGOs) and free trade zones
  • economic migration controls and rules

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How processes that influence spatial interactions are interlinked in complex ways that accelerate globalization

Multigovernmental Organisations Influence on Global Interactions

This page introduces Multigovernmental Organisations with a fun map and logo starter. The page then provides a broad range of activities based on the relevance and role for economic integration in different MGOs, including the UN, NAFTA, The World Bank and the International Monetary Fund as well as the World Trade Organisation and the economic policy of neoliberalism. It explores the role of Free Trade Zones, through the Lagos Free zone and presents the role of MGOs and Free Trade Zones  in the context  of the question, who is most likely to benefit, the host country or the global corporations?

Economic Migration - Rules and Controls

This page introduces different types of migration and then develops a number of resources that examine the global patterns of economic migration at different scales. It goes on to look in-depth at some key regions such the EU and the US as destination regions. It examines the different types of economic migrant from the illegal migrant to the elites. It then also develops the concepts of brain drain and brain gain and how some countries such as South Africa, Taiwan and India are developing policies to retain the benefits of their skilled labour.

Our “shrinking world” and the forces driving technological innovation:

  • changing global data flow patterns and trends
  • transport developments over time
  • patterns and trends in communication infrastructure and use

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How processes that influence spatial interactions are interlinked in complex ways that accelerate globalization

'The Global Village'

This page provides a number of student centered resources that enable them to explore the level of global connectivity in the world. It introduces the topic through a gallery of the latest disruptive technologies. Students then look at the concepts of the shrinking world before mapping patterns of global connectivity, using a resource pack of maps. The page then develops a large card sort and noting activity based around the changing trends in data flows, transportation and communications before going on to address the drivers of this change through the thinking of the futurist, Gerd Leonard and the convergence of the concepts 'combinatory, exponential and interdependent'.

The influence of the physical environment on global interactions:

  • natural resource availability
  • the potentially limiting effect of geographic isolation, at varying scales

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How processes that influence spatial interactions are interlinked in complex ways that accelerate globalization

The Importance of Physical Geography for Global Interactions

This page provides a concise introduction to the impacts of the physical environment on global interactions. It first develops the global pattern of resource exploitation. Using a variety of maps students explore the main suppliers of raw materials. The scale of this exploitation is highlighted in the short clip from Story Stuff. Students then explore the broader impacts of the physical environment on global interactions through a mind map activity, before looking at the relationship between global connectiveness and remoteness at varying scales from the global to the local regional scale.

Links to Pages on Human Development and Diversity

Syllabus

1. Development Opportunities

The multidimensional process of human development and ways to measure it:

  • UN Sustainable Development Goals criteria
  • validity and reliability of development indicators and indices, including the human development index (HDI) and gender inequality index (GII)
  • empowering women and indigenous or minority groups
  • Detailed illustrative examples of affirmative action to close the development gap

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How actions to support human development involve spatial interactions from local to global scales

Evaluating Development Indicators

This page provides a concise look at the role of development indicators in the measurement of development. It begins with a student activity based on defining sustainable development, focused on the SDGs and the Brundtland definition. It uses a simple drag and drop quiz to look at indicator definitions before students develop a criteria on which to evaluate different indicators. The lesson looks at the HDI and GII indicators in more detail before evaluating the holistic goals of indicators through a thought provoking video by Linda Vanasupa.

Empowering Women

This page provides a large number of activities to explore the issue of gender inequality and empowerment of women. It begins with a thought provoking discussion based on the UN choice for Ambassador for women  Wonder Woman, before looking in more depth at the face of gender inequality through a series of UN posters. This is followed up by a multiple choice quiz. Students then look at the characteristics and steps required for a country to achieve women empowerment through a number of informative resources before revisiting the UN Ambassador role through some personal (real life) stories. Students then make use of the video library of empowerment success stories to build examples at a range of scales.

Empowering Indigenous or Minority Groups

This page develops resources mainly on indigenous groups. It begins with two starter diagram that reflect indigenous economy and students attempt to develop an understanding of indigenous existence. A number of resources then focus students' attention on the challenges and role of indigenous people in modern society. There is a learning walk activity in the classroom based on the resources and information on the Cultural Survival website. Students then go on to explore the problem of the 'second stolen generation' in Australia before completing a noting sheet based on the 100 Black Men in London NGO as well as a NGO of their own choosing.

The importance of social entrepreneurship approaches for human development:

  • the work of microfinance organizations and their networks
  • alternative trading networks such as “Fairtrade”
  • TNC corporate social responsibility frameworks and global agreements

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How actions to support human development involve spatial interactions from local to global scales

Social Entrepreneurship Approaches

 This page introduces social entrepreneurship and the role of micro-finance and their networks. First, students students develop an understanding of social entrepreurship with a quick characteristics categorizing activity. This is followed up with an introduction to micro-finance schemes and the factors that make them successful. Students develop an understanding of different models of micro-finance and how they build networks. Students then research and present back on the Kiva micro-finance organisation and how they are supporting human development with an innovative approach of networking lenders directly with the borrowers.

Fair Trade

This page provides focused resources on Fairtrade. It begins with a graphic worksheet based on a Fairtrade International Video. Students then collate the numbers using a series of embedded interactive maps and graphs. This is followed up by a detailed PDF presentation on the ways Fairtrade impacts the life of small scale farmers. Students then follow this up by researching different case studies of fairtrade producers on the Fairtrade International website.

TNCs and Social Responsibility

This page looks at the role of corporate social responsibility and begins with an short intro video to the Rana Plaza disaster and resulting global accord. Students then discuss what factors motivate corporate social responsibility. This is supported by the cropped clip from the documentary The Corporate. Students then go on to look in more depth at the actions of the Rana Plaza Accord and identify its positives but also question its impact. Students then return to the TNC case studies AB Imbev and Apple Inc. to look at their specific social responsibility campaigns. The Apple example is introduced first with a mystery activity based on nets placed outside Foxconn factories.

Syllabus

2. Changing Identites and Cultures

The global spectrum of cultural traits, ethnicities and identities, and ways in which the spectrum of diversity is widening or narrowing at different scales

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

Differing evidence and perspectives on how diversity is changing at local, national and global scales

Introduction to Culture

This page begins with a lovely starter activity in which students make their own cultural iceberg. This is followed up with a detailed example and then students compare the cultural icebergs of the USA and Germany and consider one for their home/host country. Students then explore Fran Martin's models of how cultural identity can be represented and how it  impacts relationships of difference, before looking at a clipped TED talk from Chimamanda Adichie. Students go on to look at three examples of narrowing or widening diversity. The first is the process of 'Americanization' of the global culture, the second is Japanese 'hybridization'  with Western culture and the third, which relates at the national and local level relates to loss of language, due largely to urbanization.

The effects of global interactions on cultural diversity in different places:

  • the diffusion of cultural traits, and cultural imperialism
  • glocalization of branded commodities, and cultural hybridity
  • cultural landscape changes in the built environment

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

Differing evidence and perspectives on how diversity is changing at local, national and global scales

The Diffusion of Cultural Traits and Processes

This page introduces the concept and process of cultural imperialism.  Students first explore examples they know at a range of scales and then go on to look at the most dominant referenced example, 'Americanization'. A cartoon and short video are used as well as a clip from Forrest Gump. Students then develop a detailed example of cultural imperialism at the national scale, involving the Australian government policy of assimilation against the indigenous populations. Students are are introduced through the movie trailer for Rabbit Proof Fence and then students use text and video resources to examine how Australia's dominant white culture has overpowered its indigenous cultures.

Glocalization and Cultural Hybridity

This page has resources and activities that explore glocalization of branded commodities and cultural hybridity. The lesson tends to avoid the cliché examples, such as McDonalds. It begins with a gallery of glocalized brands that enables students to understand the process This includes some of the more famous food franchise examples. Students then look at the economic background that explains glocalization before looking at a number of more detailed examples of glocalization, including TV programs such The Office, Hollywood movies, Tesco and HSBC. Students then go on to look at the process of cultural hybridity of Mexican-US culture and the drivers of that change. Finally students debate the issue "This house believes that the glocalization of brand commodities increases the process of cultural hybridity".

Homogenous Urban Environments and Attempts to Stand out

This page introduces the idea of converging urban landscapes and how cultural landscapes in the built up environment are becoming more homogenized. It begins with a look at the theoretical urban models and how they suggest cities evolve. It then uses some fun gallery activities, such as name that city to develop what we mean by a cultural landscape. A presentation shows the rapid change and emergence of global cities and then students use a second presentation of urban collages to investigate the drivers of this change. These drivers are further developed through a number of short news articles before students explore how cities attempt to distinguish themselves through iconic signature architecture and cultural plants.

How diasporas influence cultural diversity and identity at both global and local scales

  • Case study of a global diaspora population and its culture(s)

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

Differing evidence and perspectives on how diversity is changing at local, national and global scales

Diaspora and their Influence on Cultural Diversity

This page firstly looks at the global trend in diaspora through a number of maps and graphics. Students are introduced to some well known diasporas and they recap the cultural influence of Chinese through their resources in the global superpowers lesson. Following a short text on the types and causes of diaspora, students discuss their influence on cultural diversity and identity. Following this students develop a case study on the Moroccan/North African diaspora. In addition to looking at their global influence, regional and local impacts are developed through a number of focused videos based on the Banlieu in Paris and Mollenbeek in Brussels. Issues such as diversity, identity, cultural integration and radicalization all emerge.

Syllabus

3. Local Responses to Global Interactions

Local and civil society resistance to global interactions:

  • rejection of globalized production, including campaigns against TNCs and in favour of local sourcing of food and goods by citizens
  • rise of anti-immigration movements

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How acceptance of, or resistance to, global interactions takes different forms and occurs at different scales

The Rejection of Globalized Production

This page provides a comprehension introduction into the role of civil society groups, in all their forms. It begins with a student synoptic mindmap activity, which aims for them to make connections across their course to problems with globalized production. This is supported by a selection of cropped news articles that illustrate some of the issues. Students are then introduced to the academic voices of discontent through Noam Chomsky, Naomi Klein and Vindana Shiva. Following this, students look at the increasing importance of civil society groups in terms of their influence on corporate and governmental policy and decision making and their savvy use of technology and social media. The Pinky Show and online petition group Avaaz are illustrated before students conduct their own research into local campaigns and activism in favour of local production.

Anti-Migration Movements

This page provides a short introduction to the rise of anti-immigration movements. It begins with students outlining the arguments and reasons behind the growing trend of anti-immigration movements through a news headline activity and Daily Mail news article. Students then make notes on the reasons for the growing anti-immigration movement and their mechanisms through a video library referencing, Denmark, the USA and the growing far right in Europe. Students then research one anti-immigration movement in their local region to identify their aim, structure of organisation as well as successes or conflicts.

Geopolitical constraints on global interactions:

  • government and militia controls on personal freedoms to participate in global interactions
  • national trade restrictions, including protectionism and resource nationalism

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How acceptance of, or resistance to, global interactions takes different forms and occurs at different scales

National Controls to Restrict Global Participation

This page develops a number of resources that enable students to explore the ways some governments and militia groups restrict the personal freedoms of their citizens to participate in global interactions. It includes a starter activity/discussion on why countries may wish to control the internet. A more detailed video activity then explains how China censors the internet through its Great Firewall. Students then go on to look at a number of other examples, including Eritrea's restriction of NGOs, Bhutan's controls on tourism, Uzbekistan's use of exit visas and Turkey's blocking of social media during a time of crisis.

National Controls on Trade

This page introduces examples of protectionism and examines which countries are the biggest protectionists. It then looks at the emerging 'America First' policy and the implication for US business of increased protectionism under Donald Trump. Students then go on to look at the arguments that support increased protectionism for many African nations. Before looking at the issue of resource nationalism, first through a number of short examples and then a FT video the emerging pattern of resource nationalism and the reasons behind it.

The role of civil society in promoting international-mindedness and participating in global interactions, including social media use and campaigning for internet freedom

  • Two detailed examples of places where restricted freedoms have been challenged

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How acceptance of, or resistance to, global interactions takes different forms and occurs at different scales

Civil Society Promotes International Mindededness and Global Interactions

This page develops resources on international mindedness and how civil society groups work to improve global interactions. The starter activities begin with a look at the IB and its interpretation of international mindedness. Students discuss how their school reflects these characteristics. Two detailed examples are then developed. Firstly, the work of Amnesty International in raising awareness and fighting for the rights of the Rohingya people in Myanmar and secondly, the role of activists in their use of social media to drive regime change as part of the Arab Spring in 2009/10.

Links to Global Risks and Resilience

Syllabus

1. Geopolitical and Economic Risks

Threats to individuals and businesses:

  • hacking, identity theft and the implications of surveillance for personal freedoms
  • political, economic and physical risks to global supply chain flows

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How the advantages of globalization must be weighed against heightened possibilities of new geopolitical and economic risks

Modern Threats

This page addresses the Modern threat of cybercrime and personal surveillance. It begins with a look at the spatial patterns of the fantastic real-time Norse map of cyber attacks, before using an infographic  on the types of cyber attacks. Students then look in more depth at the 2017 ransomware attack that affected the NHS in the UK among many other organizations. Students explore the threat to individuals through a number of other infographics and a gallery of well chosen graphs, before looking at the potential for mis-use and the infringement on people's personal freedom.

Risks to the Global Supply Chain

This page provides ressurces on a full variety of risks to global supply-chain flows. Student begin by trying to identify these risks themselves. It develops a number of key worksheets and video resources which look at specific risks in more depth. Japan is developed as a more detailed place example and then students research examples of their own real supply-chain risks based on a mind map. This exercise is aimed at synoptic links from across the course.

New and emerging threats to the political and economic sovereignty of states:

  • profit repatriation and tax avoidance by TNCs and wealthy individuals
  • disruptive technological innovations, such as drones and 3D printing

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How the advantages of globalization must be weighed against heightened possibilities of new geopolitical and economic risks

TNC Piracy

This provocatively titles page address the problem of TNC Tax avoidance and capital flight. It also covers the issue of tax avoidance schemes by wealthy individuals. The lesson begins with two graphics on tax avoidance as well an BBC news report addressing the reasons for tax avoidance and its impact. Students then complete a mapping activity on tax losses using the data within a Daily Mail news report. Students then go on to look at the spatial pattern of tax avoidance at the global scale by analyzing a shocking infographic map on showing the vast scale of capital flight from developing countries. The lesson briefly develops the problem of wealthy individuals and tax avoidance from celebrities, featuring a comical analysis from David Mitchell.

Disruptive Technologies

This page begins with a photo activity leading to a student definition of disruptive technologies. They then look at the application of drones in the economy in terms of positives but also a threat to economic sovereignty. They then examine the future security threat of drones. Students then explore the opportunities, and economic sovereignty threats of 3D printing through a number of resources, including an infographic, video and a very interesting article exploring the wider impact of 3D printing of different geographies

The correlation between increased globalization and renewed nationalism/tribalization

  • Two detailed examples to illustrate geopolitical tension/conflict

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How the advantages of globalization must be weighed against heightened possibilities of new geopolitical and economic risks

Globalisation and Renewed Geopolitical Tensions

This page provides resources on two key examples of rising nationalism as a consequence of globalization. It develops the rise of Islamism as a totalitarian ideology and movement as well as the increasing regional and global geopolitical tensions around Syria. The lesson begins with a  number of graphics introducing rising nationalism, before students look at the social-political tensions that lead to radicalization and the rise of Islamism. This is provocatively framed as a totalitarian ideology that (to some) conflicts with the western totalitarian ideology of neoliberalism.The page further develops the geopolitical/religiosity tensions around the conflict in Syria as well as the emerging 'second cold war' and proxy war between USA and Russia in Syria.

Syllabus

2. Environmental Risks

Transboundary pollution (TBP) affecting a large area/more than one country

  • One TBP case study including the consequences and possible responses

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How global interactions affect the physical environment by varying degrees at different scales

Transboundary Pollution

Students explore the global problem of plastic waste through the great ocean garbage patches or gyres. Students begin with the interactive map showing the spatial extent of ocean plastic waste. This map is then explained through an informative video. Student investigate the global spatial patterns and causes further through a large gallery of graphs. Students look deeper at the impacts of plastic on marine health and biodiversity before investigating the solutions and responses to plastic waste and evaluating these efforts.

Environmental impacts of global flows at varying scales:

  • localized pollution, including impacts along shipping lanes
  • carbon footprints for global flows of food, goods and people

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How global interactions affect the physical environment by varying degrees at different scales

Localized Pollution due to Global Flows

This page develops resources on localized pollution associated with shipping lanes, modes of transport, cruise liners and agriculture. It begins with a radio podcast explaining the problems of pollution problems from shipping. This is followed up further through a number of maps on Particulate Matter and localized concentrations with shipping lanes. Students briefly contrast the pollution levels from different types of transport before looking in more depth at the localized problems of cruise liners. Student go on to the scale of pollution from agriculture, which has both considerable local and global impacts. To conclude student work with Google Drive to flash research the environmental impacts of food,tourism and exported goods.

Environmental issues linked with the global shift of industry:

  • polluting manufacturing industries
  • food production systems for global agribusiness

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How global interactions affect the physical environment by varying degrees at different scales

Environmental Consequences of the Global Shift

This page develops resource on the environmental impacts of the global shift both in terms of the blight of deindustrialization and the environmental shocks of rapid industrialization. It begins by defining the term global shift through a simple graph of economic activity as well a GIF map which shows global change in coal production over time. Student then look at the cycle of decline resulting from deindustrialization and look at its impacts in Durham, UK and Detroit, USA. Students then use a number of maps to investigate the spatial pattern of the world's most polluted places before examining the almost apocalyptic scale of pollution in China. This includes a source investigation into the causes of cancer villages in China.

Environmental Issues of Global Food Agribusiness

This page addresses the environmental impacts of agribusiness through a number of examples. It begins with the stunning visuals from the HOME documentary, before examining a number of resources, such a video, text and graphics to explore place specific examples of environmental impact, such as Hog farms in the North Carolina, Soya plantations in Paraguay, Palm plantations in Indonesia, deforestation in the Amazon, pesticide use, and groundwater loss. The lesson concludes by looking at some of the reported benefits of biotech industries.

Syllabus

3. Local and Global Resilience

The success of international civil society organizations in attempting to raise awareness about, and find solutions for, environmental and social risks associated with global interactions

  • Detailed examples of one environmental and one social civil society organization action

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How perspectives vary on the severity of different risks and priorities for action

Civil Society Success for the Environment

This page looks in depth at the Greenpeace victory campaign that targeted the partnership between Lego and Shell and develops its clever media strategy of posters and digital videos. It goes on to look at Greenpeace's lobbying of the Obama administration and his decision to ban future oil drilling. Students then investigate the Greenpeace website to develop the solutions that Greenpeace proposes as well as the challenges and obstacles with the campaign.

Civil Society Success on Social Issues

This page takes an in-depth look at the Fly Kites Not Drones social justice group. It introduces the organization first and student sue the website to establish its aim and organization. The page then makes use of the organization's own education resources to teach students about the social justice issues focused on ethics of warfare. Students use the resources to learn but at the same evaluate the organization in terms of its role and impact on the topic of drone use in warfare.

Strategies to build resilience:

  • re-shoring of economic activity by TNCs
  • use of crowd-sourcing technologies to build resilience by government and civil society
  • new technologies for the management of global flows of data and people, including cybersecurity and e-passports

Synthesis, evaluation and skills opportunities

How perspectives vary on the severity of different risks and priorities for action

Re-shoring of Economic Activity by TNCs

This page develops resources on the growing trend of reshoring and how governments like the US and UK are promoting it. The site uses a number of videos, text resources and graphics to explore the growth in reshoring and the drivers of that change. It pays particular attention to the automotive industry in both the USA and UK and develops the reshoring of Vodaphone call centers form South Africa to the UK.

Crowd Sourcing Technologies

This page develops the growing importance of crowdsourcing for developing more resilient governments and communities. It begins by exploring through a number of different resources the different types of crowdsourcing. Students are introduced to its broad range of uses through a card sort activity with many examples, which they categorize into types of crowdsourcing. Students then focus on how crowdsourcing can be used to develop improved resilience both for governments and communities.

New Technologies for Global Flows

This page develops resources on cybersecurity and e-passports. It begins with some interesting videos revealing the types of possible cybersecurity threats and responses to it. Students then explore some new innovative technologies through a ranking card activity. Students follow a video based on the cybersecurity center in London before looking at the merits of e-passports through a number of diagrams and an informative video. Students can then decide their own debate topics and prepare a class debate on the merits of cybersecurity and e-passports.

Selected Pages

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'TNC Piracy' 22 September 2018

This provocatively titles page address the problem of TNC Tax avoidance and capital flight. It also covers the issue of...
more

free

Risks to the Global Supply Chain 22 September 2018

This page provides resources on a full variety of risks to global supply-chain flows. Student begin by trying to identify...
more

free

Modern Threats 22 September 2018

This page addresses the Modern threat of cybercrime and personal surveillance. It begins with a look at the spatial patterns...
more

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Crowdsourcing Technologies 10 March 2018

This page develops the growing importance of crowdsourcing for developing more resilient governments and communities. It...
more

free

Global Risks and Resilience 27 January 2018

This page provides links to pages with lesson plans with learning activities that cover everything in the IB guide for this...
more

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Power, Places and Networks 27 January 2018

This page provides links to pages with lesson plans with learning activities that cover everything in the IB guide for this...
more

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