Part 4

  • Strategies on how to meet the learning outcomes for Part 4 can be found in this section of the Subject Site.
  • Furthermore, several key, literary concepts have been outlined in one-off lessons, which can be applied to any text your are studying for Part 4.

Selected Pages

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Requirements 10 November 2014

In Part 4 - Literature: critical study we examine literary texts through a more form-focused lens. This is to say that...
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Narrative technique 7 July 2012

Have you ever read a story of which you already knew the ending? Why can such a story still be enjoyable? Often times,...
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Metaphor & simile 27 February 2012

Writers often use analogy to convey their message. An analogy is the comparison of two things. In language, we do this...
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Key concepts 27 February 2012

This section includes simple, 'one-off' lessons that focus on a teaching strategy or method of textual analysis. Rather...
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Outcomes 27 February 2012

Below are the three learning outcomes that one should aim to meet while studying Part 4 of the English Language and Literature...
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Figurative language 21 February 2012

Language can be used to stretch our imagination, to make the impossible sound possible, and to bring abstract ideas to...
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Comments 23

Maryssa Mann 11 October 2017 - 21:06

Dear gentlemen,

I have taken over IB Lang & Lit (HL level) from my colleague who has resigned from school. Therefore, I am completely new to this subject. I would like to ensure that the selection of texts below - suggested by my former colleague - is appropriate for parts 3 and 4. Could you kindly have a look at it?

Part 3 texts:
- The Complete Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi (PLT).
- The Color Purple by Alice Walker (PLA).
- Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (PLA).

Part 4 texts:
- 1984 by George Orwell (PLA)
- Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare (PLA)
- Maya Angelou Poetry (PLA)
** Maya Angelou is on the IB prescribed list of authors for "prose", but not for poetry. Is it also possible to use her poetry as part 4 work?

Thank you very much in advance,
Chonticha Amkham

Tim Pruzinsky 12 October 2017 - 00:59

Hi Chonticha,

Unfortunately, the Maya Angelou poetry will have to be replaced. Because she is not listed for poetry - how is that even possible? - and only listed for "prose other" - her autobiographies - you will need to choose a different poet.

Otherwise, it all technically looks okay.

Best,
Tim

Maryssa Mann 13 October 2017 - 16:05

Dear Tim,

Thank you very much for your answer. Given the fact that Maya Angelou poetry is not on the PLA list and therefore cannot be used for part 4, will it then be legitimate if it is considered as school's free choice for part 3? I have swapped it with The Color Purple, which was originally in part 3. Could you please have another look at my adjusted list?

Part 3 texts:
- The Complete Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi (PLT).
- Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (PLA).
- Maya Angelou Poetry (Free choice)

Part 4 texts:
- 1984 by George Orwell (PLA)
- Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare (PLA)
- The Color Purple by Alice Walker (PLA).
* Again, I'm not sure if The Color Purple can be used in part 3. Alice Walker is on the PLA list, but then for "Prose other".

Thank you very much in advance,

Chonticha Amkham

Tim Pruzinsky 14 October 2017 - 05:41

Hi Chonticha,

How in the world Alice Walker is not on the PLA for prose is beyond me (same goes for Maya Angelou for poetry).

So, you will need to switch out "The Color Purple." You can't use it here. Personally, I would put a poet in Part 4. It works so well with the IOC. You can still chose to use Angelou in Part 3 if you wish, as your free choice, or you can use "The Color Purple" there. That choice is up to you, but you will need to find a new text for Part 4.

Sorry about being the bearer of bad news again.

Best,
Tim

Mariam Hussain 15 October 2017 - 15:20

Hi David/ Tim,
Just a piece of advice needed...I want to do Rudyard Kipling's short stories for part 4, along with the importance of being earnest and the sea by Edward bond...Will they work well together in ur opinion?
As I think everything in these texts is valuable for ioc.

Mariam Hussain 15 October 2017 - 18:48

The texts are from 19/20th centuries....but I guess only one place they had set in...Europe

Tim Pruzinsky 16 October 2017 - 02:34

Hi Mariam,

If you think all three will work well for the IOC, and you are confident in your teaching of these texts (or your willingness to experiment with them for the first time), go for it!

You will need more geographical diversity in your Part 3 texts though. And don't forget that you will need to teach 5-10 short stories.

Best,
Tim

Mariam Hussain 16 October 2017 - 06:19

Tim,
I'm confident for these selected texts since I've taught Oscar Wilde in much detail. The Sea and Rudyard Kipling I've read thoroughly.
As for Part 3 texts are concerned
Hedda Gabler (NORWEGIAN)
To the Lighthouse (EUROPE)
Twilight in Delhi (ASIA)

Mariam Hussain 16 October 2017 - 14:26

The above mentioned texts are from different regions of the world. I'm teaching my students part 3 texts at the moment. Are these parts 3 & 4 ok now?

Maryssa Mann 15 October 2017 - 22:30

Hi Tim,

The fact that Alice Walker is not listed for PLA for prose surprised me as well. Now I'm starting to wonder whether the PLA list I have is the most updated version. The one I have is from the year 2011. Will you be able to answer me this question?

Because my students can no longer use Maya Angelou poetry for part 4, we have decided to go for Emily Dickinson poetry. Do you think her poetry is 'meaty' enough? Whose poetry is often chosen for part 4?

Best wishes,
Chonticha

Tim Pruzinsky 16 October 2017 - 02:29

Hi Chonticha,

When I answered your question about Alice Walker, I checked the PLA myself - she's not there for prose. It just surprises me.

As for poetry, I wouldn't choose Emily Dickinson. I love her poetry! I just think for the IOC, it is difficult for a lot of students to talk about one of her poems for 10 minutes straight without stopping because they are shorter. In other words, I worry they will struggle with the assessment.

Many teachers use Carol Ann Duffy, Margaret Atwood, Robert Frost, or Seamus Heaney in this section.

Best,
Tim

Maryssa Mann 25 October 2017 - 21:15

Hi Tim,

Thank you so much Tim for your answer. It was really helpful. I do agree with you that Emily Dickinson poetry is short and students might struggle to meet the time requirement. However, death, which is one of the main themes of her poems, really appeals to my students. This will motivate them to study it. Some of her longer poems are around 24 lines. Do you think these are too short for the IOC?

I have explored Seamus Heaney poetry, one of the poets you suggested. I will also ask my students to have a look at examples of his poetry before we decide whether we’re going to dive into it. When we select poems of an author to study, do we have to choose poems that are in the same collection?

Thank you in advance for your answers,
Chonticha

David McIntyre 26 October 2017 - 08:45

Hi Maryssa,

Poems of 24 lines are often adequate - remember 40 lines is a maximum; it's not a target. You need, of course, to think in terms of the complexity of the poem; is there enough 'there' for the student to talk meaningfully for 10-12 minutes?

Poems have to come from the same collection of poetry. 'Collected Poems' is, I think it can be argued, a literary work. At any rate, that is the argument I have made in working with Heaney over the last few years, and it has not been problematic.

Best regards,

David

Mariam Hussain 17 October 2017 - 10:45

Hi Tim,
another quick question.... The collection of Rudyard Kipling's short stories is "Just so stories".....I have selected five stories from them. Is that Ok?

David McIntyre 18 October 2017 - 08:48

Hi Mariam,

Please check the PLA. This gives you precise instructions on numbers of novellas, poems, and short stories. You should follow these prescriptions.

Thanks,

David

rwadubai 1 26 February 2018 - 10:42

Hi David,
I was just wondering if it is acceptable to choose IOC extracts for students rather than they choose them randomly? I have experienced 2 systems in 3 schools - 1 where the extracts are chosen specifically for students (obviously without student knowledge or input of or into their choice of extract) with justification being that it ensures a full complement of extracts across genres is catered for as well. 2. Where students are given the choice of envelopes with different extracts in each.
Are both systems suitable and how else do people deal with the allocation of extracts?
Many thanks,
Shane

David McIntyre 26 February 2018 - 11:48

Hi Shane,

What is essential is that the student has no prior knowledge. Whether you have (through choice) prior knowledge, or (through random selection) no prior knowledge does not really matter. Academic honesty is maintained in both models, and the IB do not prescribe which you should use.

Best regards,

David

Daniela Ortiz 2 April 2018 - 01:18

Hi Tim,
I've chosen Selected Poetry from William Wordsworth for Part 4. This is my first time teaching Language and Literature, so I don't know the number of poems that need to be studied and the length of them. I revised the guide and it doesn't say anything about this.
Regards,
Daniela

David McIntyre 2 April 2018 - 08:52

Hi Daniela,

Please see the Prescribed Book List (PBL). This defines a work (in the context of the course) and indicates how many poems you should include. The information you want is not in the guide (but rather the PBL).

I hope this helps.

David

Daniela Ortiz 17 April 2018 - 16:57

Hi David,

Many thanks for your help!

Regards,
Daniela

Petrina McGregor 11 April 2018 - 08:08

Hi David and Tim

I need to submit my IOCs and FOA results. Is there a specific form, like the one for Written Tasks? I am fruitlessly searching on the Programme Resource Centre. It is possible that I have got confued with the requirements for Literature. But I was sure that there was a specific form.

If not, do I simply submit my comments about their IOC and FOA on a Word Document?

Petrina McGregor 11 April 2018 - 08:08

Yikes! Aplogies for multiple postings!

Tim Pruzinsky 12 April 2018 - 05:24

Hi Petrina,

There is not a specific form anymore. First, you will need to upload your combined scores into IBIS. It will then spit back your moderation sample. When IBIS does that, it will also allow you to enter your IOC marks and comments. This was the old form that you are looking for. You will need to submit your comments there and to do so, you will need to talk to your IB Coordinator to streamline this process in a way that works for the both of you. We use a simple excel/google spreadsheet.

Please do ask if you have any more questions about this!

Best,
Tim


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